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Pullman Fire Department goes "Passionately Pink"

Pullman Fire Department goes "Passionately Pink"

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, and pink is everywhere you look – including at the Pullman Fire Department.

PFD is going “Passionately Pink for the Cute” in support of Breast Cancer Awareness. All month, PFD employees will be wearing pink shirts while on duty to show their support.

They're also holding a fundraiser, co-sponsored by Pullman Firefighters Local 1892. All funds raised this month will be split equally between the IAFF Charitable Foundation and Susan G. Komen for the Cure.

Please contact a Pullman firefighter if you would like to make a donation or purchase one of their t-shirts. You can visit www. iaffloca1892.org for additional information on how to donate. The PINK t-shirts are 100% cotton, made in the USA and $25 each.

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Leavenworth one of the most affordable for leaf peeping this fall

Leavenworth one of the most affordable for leaf peeping this fall

If you're looking for a fall getaway without breaking the bank, vacation specialists at TripAdvisor have named Leavenworth one of the top spots in the country to take in some colorful sights.

According to TripAdvisor, 83 percent of those surveyed plan to take a leisure trip this fall, with 31 percent planning to travel for the joy of viewing fall foliage. To help travelers plan, TripIndex compared the cost of a weekend getaway for two in 15 of the most popular leaf-peeping destinations in the US, including the combined average cost of a two-night stay in a bed and breakfast, a full tank of gas, apple picking and a meal at a restaurant.

Leavenworth came in at an affordable $476.89, but you'd better make your reservations now before the winter flakes start to fall.

Working 4 you: More hospitals ask for payment upfront

Working 4 you: More hospitals ask for payment upfront

If you're planning any future trips to the hospital, you may want to get your credit card ready before heading into the operating room. That's because hospitals are increasingly asking patients to pay for procedures either upfront, or before they're discharged.

Traditionally, neither patients nor providers knew the exact price of procedures until after the insurer processed the charges, but that's all changing.

New technology is now allowing hospitals to determine a patient's responsibility in advance of treatment.

Hospitals say it's important to discuss the cost as early as possible because patients are facing higher deductibles and larger payments for services. Administrators say many people don't even know what their deductible is.

Officials say Americans are shouldering a greater portion of their health care bills, and medical centers don't want to get stuck paying what their patients can't.

But for those who are worried about footing the bill early, hospitals are providing several options.

N. Idaho woman sentenced for beating death

A north-central Idaho woman's request to withdraw her voluntary manslaughter guilty plea has been rejected.

Twenty-eight-year-old Tara R. Mendenhall also on Monday received the maximum sentence of 15 years in prison, and a fine of $5,000.

The Lewiston Tribune reports that 2nd District Court Judge Michael J. Griffin told Mendenhall that it will take a long time for her to change considering her prior felony violence convictions, alcohol abuse and lack of education.

Mendenhall in September 2013 beat 45-year-old Lora K. Vandenburg.

Vandenburg died on Oct. 8 from bleeding in the brain.

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Working 4 you: Why you should fix your pets

Working 4 you: Why you should fix your pets

America grew up hearing Bob Barker's reminders to spay and neuter your pets, and veterinarians agree, sterilization is important. But why?

According to the Humane Society of the United States, there are an estimated six to eight million homeless animals entering animal shelters every year. About half of those get adopted, but sadly the other half have to be euthanized.

The primary reason for spaying and neutering your pets is population control. Every year around one million dogs are euthanized, simply because they have no place to go.

And vets say you should get your pets fixed, whether they play inside or outdoors.

But spaying and neutering doesn't only help the population of unclaimed kitties and puppies, most research finds that pets who get sterilized at a young age actually live longer, healthier lives.

Vets say that by spaying or neutering your pets, you can avoid a lot of costly medical complications in the future caused by infections.

Veterinarians say you should get your pets fixed when they are two to six months old.

Working 4 you: How much will America spend on Halloween?

Working 4 you: How much will America spend on Halloween?

Fall is here and that means retailers and shoppers are turning their attention to Halloween. But will consumers be willing to spend as much this year on costumes and candy?

Stores like Target and Walmart are already gearing up for the Holiday. And if you feel like it's just a little too early to get ready for Halloween, you may be surprised to hear that one-third of Americans say they'll be making their holiday purchases before October 1st.

Halloween is the last major retail event before the big holiday rush. It can offer retailers clues on how willing Americans will be to open their wallets, and how stores should approach holiday inventory, discounts and deals.

Many shoppers say the U.S. economy is still weighing heavily on their minds. one in five people say it will make an impact on how they approach holiday spending.

But it may not affect it as much as you'd think.

New numbers from the National Retail Federation show most consumers won't be afraid to spend on Halloween this year.

So, how much will the average American be spending?

Telephone scammers impersonating Idaho State Police

Telephone scammers impersonating Idaho State Police

Idaho State Police are issuing a warning after receiving multiple reports from various parts of the state of people receiving telephone calls from someone claiming to be from ISP.

The number that appears on caller ID will show up as an accurate ISP phone number, but is being deliberately falsified by the caller to disguise their identity.

The scammer appears to be targeting mainly students and professors along with foreign nationals, and is telling the person they have an arrest warrant requiring they pay a fine or face arrest and/or deportation.

The Idaho State Police wants to remind the public they will never call anyone on the phone to inform them a warrant has been issued for their arrest. Additionally, ISP does not collect money or any financial information over the phone for any reason.