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Environment

Asotin and Clarkston projects receive Ecology funding

A proposal by Asotin County, the City of Asotin, and the City of Clarkston was one of 10 projects statewide that were approved for funding by the Washington Department of Ecology. The projects, which have regional or statewide significance to support implementation of the Municipal Stormwater General Permits, total $2,111,841.

Washington recycles 200 million pounds of electronics

Washington recycles 200 million pounds of electronics

From the Washington Department of Ecology:


Washington’s nationally recognized E-Cycle Washington program has achieved a milestone by collecting 200 million pounds of TVs, computers and monitors for free recycling. Two-hundred million pounds equals the weight of 361 fully loaded Boeing 787 Dreamliners.

 

Palouse Falls named among best in the world

Palouse Falls named among best in the world

A travel website has included the Palouse Falls in a list of the top waterfalls in the world. The Palouse Falls was listed as number 10 on the list of 15 of the World's Most Amazing Waterfalls by Thrillist.com.

 

Thrillist.com releases daily emails highlighting entertainment, food and travel in large cities including Seattle, Austin and Las Vegas. The website includes a travel section which features fun articles about anything ranging from the best camping gear, new travel apps and even an article on the smelliest cities in the world. The site often produces best of lists, such as the best swim up bars, best travel photos of the year, and the world's most amazing waterfalls.

 

Washington prepares to Drop, Cover and Hold On

On Thursday morning, residents all across Washington will Drop, Cover and Hold On at 10:17 am. The drill is part of the second Great Washington Shake Out to better prepare our state to respond to an earthquake.

In 2012, over 710,000 people across the state participated in the Great Washington Shake Out, and this year over 850,000 people have registered. At 10:17 those people will practice the current procedure in case of an earthquake the Drop, Cover and Hold On. Participants are asked to stop what they're doing, drop to the floor, take cover under a table or another sturdy structure and hold on to it.

State wide burn ban lifted

State wide burn ban lifted

From the Washington State Department of Natural Resources:

The Washington State Department of Natural Resources today announced that the statewide burn ban on DNR-protected lands has been rescinded. Fire danger is reduced by the recent rainfall and moderating temperatures.

Restrictions set by local authorities are not affected by DNR’s action. Potential burners and the public at large are reminded to check with those local authorities before burning. For local fire restrictions, please visit: http://fortress.wa.gov/dnr/firedanger/BurnRisk.aspx

Idaho County bat tests positive for rabies

Idaho County bat tests positive for rabies

Another bat has tested positive for rabies in Idaho County. According to Public Health – Idaho North Central District, they received positive laboratory results for another infected bat. This is the 3rd rabid bat in Idaho County and the 4th overall within the North Central District this summer. It also represents the 21st rabid bat identified in the State of Idaho this summer.

From Public Health – Idaho North Central District: Rabies is a rare disease in humans; however, one or more fatal human cases do occur almost every year in the United States, predominantly from rabid bat exposures. Rabies is essentially 100% fatal; however, it is nearly always preventable by reducing exposures to wild and unvaccinated animals and medically managing animals and individuals who may have been exposed to rabid animals early after an exposure.

Second rabid bat found in Idaho County

Second rabid bat found in Idaho County

Idaho North Central District received positive laboratory results for a rabid bat in Idaho County, and is the second rabid bat within the District this month. Rabid bats have been identified in almost all regions of Idaho over the years, and north central Idaho is no exception.

Rabies is a rare disease in humans; however, one or more fatal human cases do occur almost every year in the United States, predominantly from rabid bat exposures. Rabies is essentially 100% fatal; however, it is nearly always preventable by reducing exposures to wild and unvaccinated animals and medically managing animals and individuals who may have been exposed to rabid animals early after an exposure.