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Department of Health asks dog owners to help track ticks through online survey

Department of Health asks dog owners to help track ticks through online survey

 

Washington state health officials are asking dog owners to go online and fill out a short, anonymous survey, and to send the agency any ticks they find during tick season.

 

In Washington, taking the dog for a later winter or spring-time walk comes with the added task of checking four-legged friends for ticks. The tick season has already begun in Western Washington, and in the next few weeks, the Washington State Department of Health says ticks will emerge from their winter hideaways elsewhere in the state.

 

“Many dog owners have found a tick or two on their furry friend after coming home from a walk outside,” said Dr. Liz Dykstra, entomologist for the Department of Health. “We’d like to know more about when and where they’ve picked up ticks, and if their dog has ever been diagnosed with a tick-borne disease.”

 

Washington State Department of Health warns of Salmonella illness tied to baby birds

Washington State Department of Health warns of Salmonella illness tied to baby birds

 

At least 39 Washingtonians have reported getting ill from Salmonella bacteria after coming in contact with live poultry in the past three years, according to reports reviewed by disease investigators at the state’s Department of Health. These 39 cases were associated with three separate national Salmonella outbreaks that caused more than 1,200 people to get sick. Contact with live poultry may also have contributed to more than 100 other cases of salmonellosis in our state in the past three years that weren’t associated with any known outbreak.

 

Spring is the season when many people who have chickens or ducks in backyard flocks buy baby birds. From the time the baby birds arrive at home, children should be supervised carefully to make sure they wash their hands immediately after touching the animals or their environments. Another prevention step is to make sure children don’t snuggle or kiss the young poultry.

 

Clarkston 5th grader surpasses school's fundraising record in honor of his mother

Clarkston 5th grader surpasses school's fundraising record in honor of his mother

 

The "Jump Rope For Heart" fundraising program in a longstanding tradition at Heights Elementary in Clarkston, WA. However, this year, the event was especially meaningful to one of the school's fifth graders.

 

Last year, Seth Brown lost his mother to a heart condition. In honor of his mother, Seth set out to beat the school's record for donations- and he did exactly that.

 

The American Heart Association encourages schools to participate in the Jump Rope For Heart program to help teach students and families how to take care of their hearts and the importance of staying fit. Students at participating schools raise money that supports the heart association's research and education initiatives. The Jump Rope For Heart fundraiser at Heights Elementary encouraged students in grades kindergarten through sixth to reach out to friends and family to earn pledges for jumping rope in PE class during the month of February 2015.

 

The goal for the school was to raise $5,200 total. As of today, Seth Brown has raised $1,200 in pledges - $200 more than any student at Heights has raised in nearly 23 years.

Local game developers launch crowdfunding campaign for Ebola Attack, an independent game for good

Local game developers launch crowdfunding campaign for Ebola Attack, an independent game for good

Two local developers have launched a crowdfunding campaign to prove games aren't just fun, they also have the power to make a difference in the world.

 

In their game, Ebola Attack, players act as the hero white blood cell that must protect the red cells from a deadly infection: the Ebola virus. Over the course of the game, the human body is healed as gamers progress through increasing levels of difficulty. The player’s goal is to save as many people as possible, meanwhile, all net profits from the purchase of the app will aid the relief effort in the very real Ebola war zone in West Africa.

 

 

ClearView Eye Clinic groundbreaking ceremony for new location

ClearView Eye Clinic groundbreaking ceremony for new location

ClearView Eye Clinic will be hosting a groundbreaking ceremony at the site of their new Lewiston location on Friday February 20th at 11:30a.m. The ceremony will be held at 2840 Juniper Drive, across the street from the SEL campus.

 

Festivities begin at 11:30 a.m. and the public is invited. Scheduled to open later this year, the contemporary 9800 sq. ft. facility will include a comprehensive eye clinic, a full-service on-site optical center and a state-of-the-art surgery center.

 

Clarkston School District to provide immunization services

Clarkston School District to provide immunization services

The Clarkston School District announced Friday they will provide immunization services to Clarkston students.

INBC reaches safe levels of O-negative and O-positive blood

INBC reaches safe levels of O-negative and O-positive blood

The Inland Northwest Blood Center announced good news on Thursday regarding the levels of O-negative and O-positive blood. The only supplier of blood for area hospitals reported that the supply of these types of blood has reached safe levels.  INBC said that thanks to the donors who have rolled up their sleeve to give blood, they have seen nearly 500 type O donors since Monday. This is a huge response that has brought the blood supply up a remarkable 90% in the last few days.

INBC reminded donors the need for blood does not go on vacation. They urge donors who have made an appointment to keep them in order to ensure blood supply remains at needed levels. INBC needs 200 donors every day, with nearly 90 of those being type O.