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Phone scam imitating WSU Police

Phone scam imitating WSU Police

Washington State University wants everyone to be aware of an ongoing phone scam targeting people across the state.

There have been multiple reports of people receiving phone calls from someone claiming to be an official with the WSU Police Department. The caller demands money and threatens legal trouble if the funds are not sent. Most alarming is that caller ID shows the name and phone number from a legitimate police agency.

WSU Police want you to know that they will never call anyone demanding money. Even if the caller is able to provide sensitive information (last four digits of social security number, address, date of birth, etc.) do not provide information to them.

If you do receive a call like this, WSU Police want you to report it to them at (509) 335-8548.

Casino interchange planning proceeds near Lewiston

An environmental assessment for a highway interchange at the entrance to the Clearwater River Casino is expected to be ready for public comment by December.

The Lewiston Tribune reports the Nez Perce Tribe's plan to build the interchange on U.S. Highway 95/12 has had challenges, from funding the estimated $14 million project to the logistics of constructing a broad overpass in the river corridor.

Mary Beth Frank, the Nez Perce Tribe's transportation planner, says the environmental review should be done by the end of the year.

A worry is how the project affects waterfowl nesting habitat in the Upper Goose Pasture, three miles east of Lewiston, next to project site. The tribe previously had an environmental assessment completed, but failed to secure a federal highway grant and the project has sat idle.

Working 4 you: American spending shows positive signs for the economy

Working 4 you: American spending shows positive signs for the economy

Some good news for the economy. Americans are spending more!

Purchases of durable goods, such as furniture and cell phones are increasing. For the month of August, purchasing of such items increased 2% in America. That may not seem like a lot, but compare that to an increase of only 0.1% in July.

This is according to data released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

But what drove the August rush in spending?

The biggest factor was auto sales, everything from cars to parts, which accounted for half the gains.

People typically don't make big purchases like cars unless they feel confident in the economy and their personal finances.

Overall, consumer spending increase a total of 0.5% in August.

Economists say the increase in spending is a good sign for the economy. Some say buyers are a critical indicator of the economy's health since they make up a majority of how much product gets produced in the United States.

After the financial crisis in 2008 and the recession, people cut back heavily on purchases. But, as more people are finding jobs, that should translate into more spending.

Working 4 you: Reducing your risk of breast cancer

Working 4 you: Reducing your risk of breast cancer

As most people know, October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, but do you know how to reduce your risk of the disease?

Doctors say there are steps you can take now to reduce your chances of getting the disease in the future.

Taking steps to be healthy may not prevent all breast cancers, but for most women these steps can reduce the risks.

First, doctors say to watch your weight. Being overweight or gaining weight as an adult increases the chances of developing the disease, especially after menopause. So, eat well to keep you weight in check throughout your life.

Also, get some exercise. Experts recommend about 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity each week, or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise. If possible, include at least two strength training sessions a week, as well.

Also, don't smoke. Just another reason to quit if you do smoke. And if you drink, limit yourself to no more than one drink per day. Experts say the more alcohol you consume, the greater your chance of developing breast cancer.

If you are able to breast feed when you have children, doctors say this can offer some protection against the disease as well.

Working 4 you: More hospitals ask for payment upfront

Working 4 you: More hospitals ask for payment upfront

If you're planning any future trips to the hospital, you may want to get your credit card ready before heading into the operating room. That's because hospitals are increasingly asking patients to pay for procedures either upfront, or before they're discharged.

Traditionally, neither patients nor providers knew the exact price of procedures until after the insurer processed the charges, but that's all changing.

New technology is now allowing hospitals to determine a patient's responsibility in advance of treatment.

Hospitals say it's important to discuss the cost as early as possible because patients are facing higher deductibles and larger payments for services. Administrators say many people don't even know what their deductible is.

Officials say Americans are shouldering a greater portion of their health care bills, and medical centers don't want to get stuck paying what their patients can't.

But for those who are worried about footing the bill early, hospitals are providing several options.

N. Idaho woman sentenced for beating death

A north-central Idaho woman's request to withdraw her voluntary manslaughter guilty plea has been rejected.

Twenty-eight-year-old Tara R. Mendenhall also on Monday received the maximum sentence of 15 years in prison, and a fine of $5,000.

The Lewiston Tribune reports that 2nd District Court Judge Michael J. Griffin told Mendenhall that it will take a long time for her to change considering her prior felony violence convictions, alcohol abuse and lack of education.

Mendenhall in September 2013 beat 45-year-old Lora K. Vandenburg.

Vandenburg died on Oct. 8 from bleeding in the brain.

Working 4 you: Why you should fix your pets

Working 4 you: Why you should fix your pets

America grew up hearing Bob Barker's reminders to spay and neuter your pets, and veterinarians agree, sterilization is important. But why?

According to the Humane Society of the United States, there are an estimated six to eight million homeless animals entering animal shelters every year. About half of those get adopted, but sadly the other half have to be euthanized.

The primary reason for spaying and neutering your pets is population control. Every year around one million dogs are euthanized, simply because they have no place to go.

And vets say you should get your pets fixed, whether they play inside or outdoors.

But spaying and neutering doesn't only help the population of unclaimed kitties and puppies, most research finds that pets who get sterilized at a young age actually live longer, healthier lives.

Vets say that by spaying or neutering your pets, you can avoid a lot of costly medical complications in the future caused by infections.

Veterinarians say you should get your pets fixed when they are two to six months old.