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How to protect yourself from the eBay data breach

How to protect yourself from the eBay data breach

If you use eBay, change your password. That's the message from the company after hackers broke into the online retail site and now have customer names, passwords, email addresses and other sensitive information.

The online marketplace says there is no evidence financial information was stolen, but if you are one of the 145 million people with an account on eBay... Some of your personal information, like your date of birth and address, could be in the hands of hackers, but there are things you can do to ward off hackers, according to Chelsea Maguire with the Better Business Bureau.

"It's very important that people change their passwords regularly, we often just get very used to it and we don't want to try to remember something new but when you do change your password regularly it reduces your risk of any hacker going through and find that information," Maguire said.

If you're changing your password, make it something difficult to thwart hackers.

"Simple numbers, your child's birth date, name, those are easily guessed and found, make sure it is very complicated, has uppercase, lowercase, numbers and symbols," Maguire said.

Nationwide warrant issued for Clarkston stabbing suspect

Nationwide warrant issued for Clarkston stabbing suspect

Asotin County District Judge Ray D. Lutes Wednesday afternoon signed a nationwide warrant for a 34-year-old Lewiston man on a charge of 1st-degree assault in connection with an alleged stabbing last night in the Clarkston Heights. The bond for JD Miller was set at $500,000, according to officials.

Hoopfest registration deadline extended

Hoopfest registration deadline extended

If you missed the Hoopfest registration deadline you’re in luck. Hoopfest has extended the deadline through Monday and will allow up to 150 more teams to register.

Nez Perce County deputy downs utility pole

Nez Perce County deputy downs utility pole

A Nez Perce County Sheriff's Deputy was involved in a minor collision earlier this afternoon in the area of Thain and Cedar Avenue. There were no injuries.


Deputy Greg Egbert was conducting traffic enforcement in the area and turned his patrol vehicle in an attempt to intercept a violator. "In doing so, the patrol vehicle struck a utility pole knocking it down causing the wires to fall across two other vehicles," according to a press release.

Riggins Jumps in for Justin

Riggins Jumps in for Justin

You may have have seen a few videos posted on Facebook of people in Riggins jumping into rivers, creeks, ponds, swimming pools, and even kiddie pools and water troughs recently for the fundraiser, Jump in for Justin. It was created by Tracey Bird after she had seen friends in Missouri participate in a cold water challenge and she thought it could be adjusted to help the Mann family.

Bank robbery suspect makes unfortunate fashion choice

Bank robbery suspect makes unfortunate fashion choice

When a Nampa, Idaho man got dressed Sunday morning, he probably didn't think his t-shirt choice would end up being immortalized in his mugshot. But, there's 35-year old Ricky Fisher under arrest with the words "It's all fun and games until the cops show up" printed across his chest.

Fisher and 19-year old Jennifer Balfe from Meridian were arrested Sunday. Lewiston Police had received information that a couple suspected of robbing the Cottonwood Bank were staying at the Cedars Inn. The police department staged the SWAT team outside the motel.

At about 11:00 Sunday morning, the suspects came out of their room and were confronted by police. They were taken into custody and transported to the Lewiston Police Department for questioning. Lewiston Police say Fisher and Balfe are also suspected of robbing two banks in Ontario, Oregon as well.

Cottonwood Police and the FBI are overseeing the investigation.

Fungus, pests afflict Northwest's ponderosa pines

Foresters say pests and fungal infections are afflicting the region's ponderosa pines, and while they seldom kill the trees, they do worry landowners.

The Spokesman-Review reports that the unsightly appearance of the trees is being caused by fungal infections and tiny insects called pine scale that thrive during cool, moist conditions. Pine scale can look like paint spatters, while fungi are identified by black or brown splotches on the needles.

Steve McConnell, a Washington State University Extension forester in Spokane, says he's getting two to three calls per day from panicky landowners. But he says that if trees are otherwise healthy, they should recover no problem.

State Department of Natural Resources officer Guy Gifford says the outbreaks are typically not so widespread. This year, he's seeing acres of affected trees, and he says that is unusual.