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79th Annual Junior Livestock show underway at fairgrounds

79th Annual Junior Livestock show underway at fairgrounds

The 79th Annual Junior Livestock show, a great event that teaches kids discipline and responsibility, is underway at the Spokane Interstate Fairgrounds.

Long before the fairgrounds was known for its carnival rides and cotton candy it was a marketplace and this weekend, children as young as third graders are working hard to sell their livestock.

When other kids may be trying to score the latest video game the kids participating in 4H and FFA are focused on raising healthy food for your family.

"Well there's a lot of feed you have to buy and you have to get up early and feed and water him and wash him before the shows," Abby Davis from Bonner's Ferry, Idaho said.

While Davis, who is 15-years-old, already owns her own cattle herd, Savannah Chadwick is raising prize-winning pigs.

"They may be dirty animals but you learn to love things. That's what makes kids passionate and that leads to sports or whatever they want to do college someday, a job. They learn to love it," Chadwick said.

Competitors also learn the meaning of an honest day's work and gain some very grown-up outlooks on life.

Unicorn awards catch on in LCSC classroom

Unicorn awards catch on in LCSC classroom

The awards that Jill Thomas-Jorgenson started giving out to her students in Lewis-Clark State College's Strategic Management capstone class for graduating Management and Business Administration students have become coveted items. A few years ago, she started giving out pink unicorn (innovative) and purple squirrel awards (research = nut gathering) thinking that her students would believe they were silly. But, she says, students love the awards and actually compete for them.

N. Idaho judge dismisses former principal's appeal

An appeal filed by a fired northern Idaho high school principal contending racism in her termination has been dismissed.

The Lewiston Tribune reports in a story on Tuesday that 2nd District Court Judge Michael J. Griffin dismissed former Kamiah High School Principal Veneice Guillory-Lacy's appeal after ruling the school board didn't have to allow irrelevant evidence at the termination hearing.

Guillory-Lacy's attorney argued she was fired because she tried to implement race-neutral policies at the school.

School officials say she was fired because she didn't receive her administrator certification in a timely way.

Guillory-Lacy says she will take the matter to the Idaho Human Rights Commission where issues of discrimination are addressed.

Guillory-Lacy has also filed a notice to sue the school district seeking $500,000.

Fungus that causes fever found in state

A fungus that can launch a fatal illness has been found for the first time in the soil of Washington.

Officials for Washington State University say the fungus can cause an illness called valley fever. The fungus is normally found in semiarid parts of the Southwest.

Valley fever occurs when the soil-dwelling fungus becomes airborne, releasing spores that get lodged in the lungs of humans and certain animals, especially dogs.

The Centers for Disease Control estimates it kills 160 people a year.

Three unrelated cases were diagnosed in Eastern Washington in 2010-11.

Scientists for Washington State say that soil samples taken recently from the vicinity tested positive for the fungus, proving it can survive here. All three people who got sick in Eastern Washington survived.

Man proposes to girlfriend after Bloomsday

Man proposes to girlfriend after Bloomsday

Tom Curalli defines what it means to be a Bloomie.

"Today is a big day, it's my 35th Bloomsday," said Curalli.

Curalli said he would never miss a Bloomsday. He loves how the race brings the community and families together. The theme of togetherness inspired him to make this day about the most important person in his life.

"I'm going to propose to my girlfriend at the finish line in front of a lot of a lot of people," said Curalli.

Curalli has prepared for the big day since February. He chose not to share the plan with anyone, and the anticipation was starting to get the best of him.

"I'm pretty excited, a little nervous, had a bit of trouble sleeping last night,"said Curalli.

The couple have been dating for about a year, but have been close friends for nearly six.











Clarkston man rides 2,000 miles for archery program

Clarkston man rides 2,000 miles for archery program

Long-time Clarkston archery volunteer, David Hudson, will begin a 2,810-mile bicycle ride along the Lewis and Clark Expedition Trail on May 14th. As part of his 70th birthday present to himself, he is raising money for the Clarkston School District's Archery Program.