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Rejoice fritter fans! It's National Doughnut Day!

Rejoice fritter fans! It's National Doughnut Day!

Friday is National Doughnut Day, also known as, well, Friday among journalists, and what better way to celebrate to celebrate the holiday that with a couple dozen maple bars, apple fritters and bear claws.

One of the biggest boosters for National Doughnut Day every day is Brenda Rigby, the manager of Scrumdiddlyumptious Donuts and reigning donut queen, who her regulars call a bit of a spark plug.

"She is like a firecracker, you never know what's going to happen," Tom Peterson said.

"Twinkle toes, just a nickname, she is always on the go," Del Murphy said.

Peterson and Murphy are at her donut shop every day.

"It's great having them here. And Deputy Craig [Chamberlin] was here and it is always good to see him," Rigby said.

Chamberlin was in rare form Friday morning, talking with the Salvation Army's Sheila Gearaghty about why donuts came about in the first place. The answer? The Salvation Army created them to hand out to soldiers, or rather doughboys, during World War I.

Navy SEAL expresses grave concern about Bergdahl prisoner swap

Navy SEAL expresses grave concern about Bergdahl prisoner swap

Navy SEAL Jason Redman, who captured enemy insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan during his tour of duty, expressed his anger about the five prisoners the U.S. swapped for Bowe Bergdahl's release from the Taliban while talking with local law enforcement officers at Gonzaga University Wednesday.

Redman, who was shot eight times in an al-Qaida ambush in 2007, worries some detainees freed from Guantanamo Bay are the same people his unit faced on the battlefield.

Redman was in Spokane Wednesday to talk to approximately 200 local law enforcement officers, Washington State troopers and airmen from Fairchild Air Force Base at Gonzaga University, sharing his incredible story of survival and determination.

While on tour in Iraq, Redman's team faced a life or death situation when they hit an ambush.

"Unfortunately we walked right into an ambush situation," he said. "They had pre-staged fighting positions, two PKM machine guns. multiple AK-47s."

Judge rules against evidence in missing mom case

Judge rules against evidence in missing mom case

Prosecutors in northern Idaho won't be able to present evidence from an experiment intended to show their theory about how a Washington state woman's body was dumped in the Snake River by her estranged husband.

The Lewiston Tribune reports that 2nd District Judge Michael J. Griffin on Monday denied the request from the Latah County Prosecutor's Office.

Rachael Anderson, a 40-year-old mother of four from Clarkston, Washington, was in the process of getting a divorce when she disappeared in April 2010.

Authorities say she was lured to a Moscow, Idaho, auto repair shop owned by 52-year-old Charles A. Capone, where she was drugged and killed. Her body hasn't been found.

Capone is charged with first-degree murder.

Griffin says the river has likely changed in the last four years.

After five years in captivity Bergdahl faces long recovery

After five years in captivity Bergdahl faces long recovery

Long time Spokane resident Dale Storr remembers what its like to come home after being a prisoner of war, and said that Bowe Bergdahl has a long road to recovery ahead of him.

In 1991, Storr was an Air Force A-10 pilot who was shot down and held captive by Saddam Hussein's Republican Guard for 33 days. During his captivity he endured torture and even bombing by American warplanes. Lt. Col. Storr, who retired from the 141st Air Refueling Wing after 28 years of service in 2011, remembers the savage and brutal treatment he received at the hands of his Iraqi captors.

Throw in five years Bergdahl's been held prisoner and no one expect him to make a speedy recovery.

Storr was on his 17th mission on February 2, 1991 when his aircraft was hit during a strafing run. The strike severed the control cables of his plane as well as damaged his radio.

"Fortunately for me I ejected just in time, just before the plane hit the ground, got the chute. I landed without injuries and as soon as I was on the ground I could see the truck with the Iraqis coming to get me," he recalled.

Are lawmakers looking to end the war on cannabis?

Lawmakers in Congress voted to restrict DEA funding so that the feds wouldn't go after medical marijuana operations in states where it's legal. It's one of the first signs U.S. lawmakers are looking to end the war on cannabis.

Basically this legislation would mean medical marijuana growers following the rules wouldn't have to fear being raided by the DEA. The DEA would have to focus their resources elsewhere.

"It's come about and we're still going to keep pushing forward until we get the results we want, that's why we vote," Joseph Harrison at Kouchlock Productions said.

That's what the U.S. House of Representatives recognized in its vote, passing a measure to block federal agents from pursuing legal medical marijuana operations.

"They're not going to be singled out and targeted and they're not going to be arrested and that's definitely the key point to this," Harrison said.

Safe holiday driving tips from Idaho State Police

Safe holiday driving tips from Idaho State Police

From the Idaho State Police:


Memorial Day weekend is not only a time to reflect and honor our veterans, but also a time when many Idahoans take to the road to enjoy the unofficial kick-off of summer.   During Memorial Day weekend in 2013, there were 137 crashes on Idaho roads with 79 people injured and 2 fatalities.  The Idaho State Police offer some safety reminders to drivers to ensure that this holiday is safe for everybody on the road.  
 

Waspocalypse! How to protect your home against pests this summer

Waspocalypse! How to protect your home against pests this summer

A very nice looking forecast for the Memorial Day weekend but some uninvited guests could disrupt your party or picnic as yellow jackets are already showing up in record numbers.

Experts say there are an unprecedented number of yellow jacket queens flying around this spring and they threaten to breed clouds of offspring. If you don't like having your barbecue buzzed it's time to start your battle against yellow jackets now.

The people who put out their yellow jacket traps early this year are seeing some disturbing results.

Queens are emerging in record numbers after fattening up during a long and mild fall.

"Well the large number of queens that we're seeing right now kind of really adds up to a perfect storm for hornets and yellow jackets this summer," Stephanie Cates with Rescue Pest Products said.

Right now queens are looking for nesting spots. If they find a suitable throne in your yard, your trouble with yellow jackets will multiply.

"Each yellow jacket queen can represent 200 to 2000 yellow jackets later on this summer depending on the colony size," Alyssa Ando with Rescue Pest Products said.