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Burn ban on DNR forestland east of Cascades starts July 1

Burn ban on DNR forestland east of Cascades starts July 1

Another warning in the face of the upcoming Fourth of July weekend – the Washington State Department of Natural Resources has placed a burn ban on all DNR-protected land east of the Cascades.

Starting July 1 and running until September 30, the burn ban applies to all forestland under DNR fire protection.

“The seasonally dry weather creates a greater risk for wildfires,” said Commission of Public Lands Peter Goldmark. “A burn ban helps to prevent them and protects forests, habitat and property.”

So far this year DNR has already had 172 wildfire starts, which have burned approximately 779 acres across the state.

The ban applies to all outdoor burning on DNR forestland with two exceptions:

Recreational fires in approved fire pits

Gas or propane stoves and barbecue grills

Fireworks and incendiary devices like exploding targets, sky lanterns or tracer ammunition are also illegal.

Warning for campers at Lake Roosevelt 4th of July weekend

Warning for campers at Lake Roosevelt 4th of July weekend

If you're headed to Lake Roosevelt for the upcoming Fourth of July weekend, the Washington Bureau of Reclamation wants to make sure your campsite stays high and dry.

They're advising people camping along the Lake Roosevelt shoreline to be aware of potential dangers that could exist due to rapidly rising lake levels. The lake is impounded by Grand Coulee Dam on the Columbia River about 90 miles west of Spokane.

“When camping along the shoreline, it is recommended that tents and other belongings be kept well away from the water's edge,” said Public Affairs Officer Lynne Brougher. “Although the lake is a popular vacation spot, it is also a working reservoir that supplies water for hydroelectric facilities at Grand Coulee Dam which can result in rapid fluctuations.”

Brougher says campsites that are too close to the water's edge could potentially become flooded and boats that are not properly anchored or secured could drift out into the lake and become a safety hazard.

Firework sales blast off this weekend

Firework sales blast off this weekend

The Fourth of July is just a week away, and firework sales begin this weekend!

Washington State Fire Marshal Chuck Duffy wants to remind residents to know the local laws before purchasing and discharging fireworks, and to make sure you are only using legal fireworks. This year, 937 licenses were issued for retail firework stands.

A fireworks ban has been in place in the unincorporated areas of Spokane County for 21 years, as well as Spokane, Spokane Valley, Cheney and Liberty Lake.

Fireworks are legal on private property in Airway Heights, Medical Lake and Deer Park.

Bottle rockets, missiles and firecrackers are illegal anywhere in Washington state.

In Coeur d'Alene, non-aerial fireworks are allowed on private property but not in public places like Tubbs Hill or City Park.

If you do find yourself in an area where fireworks are allowed, there are some guidelines you to keep in mind to make sure your family has a safe and fun Fourth.

Palouse Falls named among best in the world

Palouse Falls named among best in the world

A travel website has included the Palouse Falls in a list of the top waterfalls in the world. The Palouse Falls was listed as number 10 on the list of 15 of the World's Most Amazing Waterfalls by Thrillist.com.

 

Thrillist.com releases daily emails highlighting entertainment, food and travel in large cities including Seattle, Austin and Las Vegas. The website includes a travel section which features fun articles about anything ranging from the best camping gear, new travel apps and even an article on the smelliest cities in the world. The site often produces best of lists, such as the best swim up bars, best travel photos of the year, and the world's most amazing waterfalls.

 

Moscow and Lapwai hoping for votes to win community grant

Moscow and Lapwai hoping for votes to win community grant

Moscow and Lapwai are both finalists for grants that would fund programs geared at reducing the rate of childhood obesity in the cities. The High Five Children's Health Collaborative will give out grants to three winning cities that are between $50,000 and $300,000 over the course of three years.

 

The High Five Children's Health Collaborative is funded by the Blue Cross of Idaho and focuses on programs to lower the rate of childhood obesity throughout Idaho. One in three children in the state are currently obese. Communities that applied for one of the grants had to present an action plan that addressed the following in their community:

New restrictions remain in place at Illia Dunes

New restrictions remain in place at Illia Dunes

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is reminding residents in the region that the popular Illia Dunes, located on the Snake River about three miles downstream of Lower Granite Lock and Dam, continues to be limited with the number of visitors that are allowed.