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Check your child's vaccinations before heading back to school

Check your child's vaccinations before heading back to school

Getting ready for back to school means getting school supplies and backpacks, but it's also the perfect time to make sure children are up-to-date on their shots. Getting all of the recommended shots is one of the most important things parents can do to protect their kids' health.

A new survey from the Washington State Department of Health shows vaccination rates are on the rise (71 percent in 2013 versus 65 percent the year before) but are still below the Healthy People 2020 goal of 80 percent, leaving many kids unprotected.

Below is a summary of shots children need:

WSU student planners feature rival school on cover

WSU student planners feature rival school on cover

Students at Washington State University did a double-take when they received their free student planners from The Bookie this week. The cover features a picture of a cougar, the iconic Bryan clock tower and a building that was a little harder to identify.

Down at the very bottom of the cover, with beautiful brick and elegant cherry trees is Savery Hall, a building located at the heart of the campus of WSU's sworn rival – the University of Washington.

Distraught manager Leslie Martin at WSU's bookstore The Bookie says they are aware of the problem and are working with the vendor to come to a solution. The planners are no longer being handed out, but the ones that have been released are not being collected.

There is no word on whether the school will receive a refund or whether a reprint with a corrected cover is in the works. Meanwhile, a photo of the planner is quickly making the rounds online drawing amusement and criticism.

Idaho awarded grant to help low-income students take exams

Idaho awarded grant to help low-income students take exams

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded Idaho $75,552 as part of its efforts to boos college and career readiness for historically under-served students. The grant will help defray the costs of taking advanced placement tests for low-income students.

“This is an opportunity for students throughout Idaho to excel. This grant, along with Advanced Opportunities programs like Fast Forward, offered through the Idaho Department of Education, give students the opportunity to earn college credits in high school,” said Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna. “It's a chance for students to excel without the worry of a financial burden.”

The grants are used to help pay for low-income students taking approved placement tests administered by the College Board, the International Baccalaureate Organization and Cambridge International Examinations. By subsidizing test fees for low-income students, the program is intended to encourage students to take advanced placement tests and obtain college credit for high school courses, reducing the time and cost required to complete a degree.

Deadline today for $900k in scholarships

Deadline today for $900k in scholarships

Today is the deadline to apply for a scholarship for North Idaho College, and with more than $900,000 being offered you don't want to wait.

Today's deadline is for the fall 2014 semester and allows students time to attend an orientation session, register for classes, purchase books and pay for classes prior to the start of school on August 25.

New students can click here to download an application. Awarding criteria of each scholarship varies and all students are encouraged to apply.

Recipients also include traditional credit students who can click here for information on how to apply. NIC Foundation scholarships are also available for Workforce Training and Dual Credits students with applications available through those respective programs.

 

EWU sending financial aid counselors to students in Carlton Complex fire

EWU sending financial aid counselors to students in Carlton Complex fire

In an effort to help students and their families impacted by the Cartlton Complex fires, Eastern Washington University will send a team of financial aid counselors and outreach staff to Okanogan County to assist those who are planning to attend Eastern this fall.

The financial aid and outreach team will be in Okanogan County the week of August 11 to meet with students and their families. As the date approaches, details on the exact location and times will be announced and posted on the university website and Facebook page.

Eastern has also authorized $250,000 of aid for an EWU Student Hardship Fund to help with tuition and housing for current and incoming students.

EWU Vice President for Student Affairs Stacey Morgan Foster said financial aid counselors will have the authority to award hardship grants during their visit. The grants are also available to EWU students outside of the Carlton Complex fire area.

Lewis-Clark State College names new Provost

Lewis-Clark State College names new Provost

Dr. Lori Stinson has been appointed as Lewis-Clark State College Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. The appointment was made by LCSC President J. Anthony Fernández and was effective July 1st.

Stinson had been serving as Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs since May of 2013, and prior to that, she had served as Chair of the Nursing and Health Sciences Division since 2007.

Stinson joined the LCSC faculty in 1984 and served as an instructor until 1986, and rejoined the LCSC faculty as an assistant professor in 1997. She also worked as community health nurse with the Suquamish Tribe in Washington; public health nurse with the Seattle-King County Public Health Department; rural health volunteer with the Peace Corps in the Dominican Republic; and ER and staff nurse at Gritman Medical Center in Moscow, according to a press release.

WSU researchers create gel to keep fields healthy during drought

WSU researchers create gel to keep fields healthy during drought

Washington State University researchers have created a product that could help farmers keep their fields moist during a drought.

Led by Associate Professor Jinwen Zhang, the group created hydrogel pellets similar to the super absorbent material used in diapers. The main difference is what they're made of. While diapers rely on petrolium based gel, WSU researchers have created one out of soy protein.

The pellets swell to hold 250 times their weight in water, and because they are made of biodegradable agricultural material instead of chemicals they leave no residue behind when they disintegrate in the ground. In fact, the soy protein can actually act as a source of nitrogen to help plants grow.

A soy-based product would also lessen dependence on foreign oil imports, and boos the local economy since the U.S. Produces half of the world supply of soy beans.