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Gonzaga coach Mark Few needs votes to win $100,000 for the Community Cancer Fund

Gonzaga coach Mark Few needs votes to win $100,000 for the Community Cancer Fund

Gonzaga University Men's Basketball Coach, Mark Few, is participating in the Infiniti Coaches' Charity Challenge for a chance to win $100,000 for the Community Cancer Fund.

 

However, Coach Few will not be able to win this challenge alone. In order to win the $100,000 the public will need to cast their votes in Coach Few's favor.

 

Few is one of 48 NCAA basketball coaches competing in the Infiniti Coaches' Charity Challenge. As of Monday, January 5th, fans have been able to head to www.VoteCoachFew.com to cast their votes to help advance him in the competition.

 

WSU Athletic Hall of Fame to induct Steve Gleason at Apple Cup on Saturday

WSU Athletic Hall of Fame to induct Steve Gleason at Apple Cup on Saturday

Washington State University will induct Steve Gleason as the 178th member of the school's Athletic Hall of Fame during this year's Apple Cup game. The ceremony is set to take place during an on-field ceremony between the first and second quarters of Saturday's game against Washington.

 

“I'd encourage fans to be there to make sure they don't miss anything,” said Associate Director of Athletics, Bill Stevens.

 

Stevens said each year a selection committee determines who is elected into the hall of fame.

 

State Parks invites people to go ‘deep’ into Rockport State Park

State Parks invites people to go ‘deep’ into Rockport State Park

This winter, staff and volunteers from the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission will offer guided hikes through the ancient, old growth forest at Rockport State Park.

The Deep Forest Experience hikes take place between 10:00 a.m. And 2:00 p.m. every Friday, Saturday and Sunday from December 5 through February 15, at Rockport State Park. The park is located just off the North Cascades Highway (Hwy 20), .06 miles west of the town of Rockport.

Leave the firewood at home to keep forests safe

Leave the firewood at home to keep forests safe

The Idaho Department of Lands is reminding outdoor enthusiasts who are planning to camp this Labor Day weekend to leave the firewood at home!

As millions of Americans head into the wilderness for a weekend of fun, many bring their own firewood, not realizing that they put the nation's forests at risk by potentially spreading tree-killing pests. While most of these pests can't travel far on their own, many can hitchhike undetected on firewood, later emerging and starting infestations in new locations hundreds of miles away.

The Don't Move Firewood campaign began in 2007 as a response to the rapid spread of the emerald ash borer, an Asian beetle brought to the US in pre-packaged wood and responsible for killing 100 million ash trees since the early 1990's.

More than 450 other non-native forest insects and diseases are also established in the United States, many spread the same way.

Washington state parks free to visit Monday

Washington state parks free to visit Monday

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission wants the public to know that Monday, August 25 is a state parks “free day,” Visitors will not need a Discover Pass to visit state parks.

The free day is in honor of the birthday of the National Park Service, which was established on August 25, 1916.

State free days are part of the legislation that created the Discover Pass, a $30 annual of $10 one-day permit required on lands managed by Washington State Parks, the Washington departments of Natural Resources and Fish & Wildlife. The Discover Pass legislation provided that state parks could designate up to 12 free days each year when the pass would not be required. The pass is still required to access lands managed by DNR and Fish and Wildlife.

The free days apply only to day use, and not to overnight stays or rental facilities.

The next free days coming up on September 27 for National Public Lands Day and November 11 for Veterans Day.

Local game designer looking for success with Kingdoms in Peril

If you're a board game enthusiast who's always on the lookout for a new addition, you may want to check out local Spokane designer Thomas Kaufman and his fast-paced, highly competitive card game Kingdoms in Peril.

I had the chance to sit down and learn Kingdoms recently, and picked it up almost immediately. Set in the ancient middle east (the cards themselves designed with historical carvings from 700 BC, featured in the British museum), each player builds their own kingdom of villages and towns with their capital as the crowning jewel.

Once set-up is complete, players then go to work building a hand of cards that houses their armies, equipment and defensive tactics before turning on each other in an ancient battle royal. To the victor go the spoils, and with a two-hour time limit the winner is declared by either a tally of points (each village, town and city has a numbered value when captured) or when one kingdom emerges victorious.

Working 4 you: Just how good for you is running?

Working 4 you: Just how good for you is running?

Good news for runners.

A new study shows the benefits of running for your health, but this study says it doesn't matter if you're a 15-minute miler, or an elite marathoner. The benefits are still the same.

According to the study running, even for a few minutes a day, can reduce your risk of death from heart disease compared to those who don't run at all. That study was published this week in the journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Researchers studied some 55,000 adults between the ages of 18 and 100 over a 15 year period. They noted their overall health, if they ran and how long they lived.

Compared to non-runners, investigators found those who ran had a 30% lower risk of death from all causes, and a 45% lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease.

In fact, runners on average lived three years longer compared to those who did not hit the pavement.

When data was broken down by age, sex, body mass index, smoking and alcohol use, the benefits were still the same. And the speed at which runners ran made little difference.